Looking for corporate career site examples that utilize candidate feedback? You’re in the right place.

The corporate career site is often the most underperforming asset a recruiting organization possesses. I’ve written before that  only 1% or so of candidates who visit the corporate career site ever apply for a job.

Yet, you have the other 99% researching your company, searching for jobs, and experiencing your employer brand. Perhaps you are taking measures to get them to join a talent network, which is good.

But there is a lot you can learn from the other 99% that can greatly impact the ability of your corporate career site to convert visitors to applicants. One of the most effective things you can do is gather corporate career site feedback from your visitors. Below, I’ve curated corporate career site examples that make great use of feedback and I’ve detailed what I like about each.

Corporate Career Site Example #1: Workiva

Workiva has a CandE Award winning recruiting team. The CandE Award Program surveys candidates and recognizes organizations with top candidate feedback scores. They clearly know a thing or two about candidate experience.

Career site example feedbackWorkiva’s career site is clean and uncluttered. They’ve taken great pains to streamline the search and apply processes on their site. From a feedback standpoint, they’ve done a great job embedding feedback collection devices throughout the site. They’ve branded their feedback button with their corporate career site colors and it fits in perfectly with their employer brand.

They also have kept it very short. They ask:

  • How did you find us (additional source and motivation data)?
  • Did you find what you’re looking for (site ease of use)?
  • Rate your experience finding and navigating our site (site ease of use and satisfaction)
  • What can we do to improve your experience on our career site (anecdotal improvement ideas)?

They’ve done a great job making it easy to provide feedback, ensuring the process is super fast and included an open ended question, which in my opinion is crucial to getting the kind of feedback that can provide breakthroughs in terms of surfacing issues and identifying opportunities to improve corporate career site performance.

Corporate Career Site Example #2: Wells Fargo

Career site example feedbackThe second of these corporate career site examples is Wells Fargo. Their candidate experience feedback strategy is very different. It appears they are trying to learn more about intrinsic motivators. Like Workiva, Wells Fargo has embedded feedback collection and is very smartly keeping their surveys short. Like Workiva, their feedback button and their surveys are branded with company colors and logos, and they have very engaging forms. But take a look at Wells Fargo’s questions:

  • Which of the following describes what you are primarily looking for in an opportunity?
  • What motivates you the most at work?
  • My primary goal for the next five years is:
  • What’s most important to me is:
  • What is your timetable for finding a new job?

Without going into the detail of including the answer options, it seems clear that Wells Fargo is interested in learning about what is driving their candidates in their job search. In aggregate, that data is somewhat limited in value. But when you overlay those drivers against the jobs these candidates are browsing and applying for, you get an unprecedented view of which jobs appeal to which motivators.

That is hugely valuable data that can drive changes in how you market and brand those jobs. And those changes can dramatically increase the odds of getting the right job in front of the right person with the right branding/messaging.

Corporate Career Site Example #3: Craft Brew Alliance

Craft Brew Alliance, besides being the last of my corporate career site examples, is the ninth largest brewer in the U.S. with such brands as Red Hook, Widmer Brothers, Kona Brewing Company, Omission Beer, and Square Mile Cider.

Career site example feedbackCBA’s Career Site Feedback uses a bit of both the Workiva and Wells Fargo Strategies. Like the other two example companies, the feedback collection is embedded in the corporate career site.

CBA has taken the branding to the next level. In addition to adopting the look and feel of the brand, CBA’s surveys include a pleasing background showing a delicious brewed beverage, with the Widmer Brothers Brewery in the background. This is just the kind of image that would appeal to their prime candidate.

As for questions, here’s what CBA wants to know:

  • Searching for the job was (easy, Just OK, Really Hard)
  • If you filled out an application, the application process was (Easy, Standard, I’ve Seen Better)
  • BEFORE applying my perception of Craft Brew Alliance as an Employer was (Fan #1 Right Here!, Neutral, Negative, I Didn’t Know CBA Until Today)
  • Overall my satisfaction level with the application process was (Very Satisfied, It Works, Never Again!)
  • We’re always looking to do things better. Do you have any suggestions for our Career Site information or the application process?
  • Have you previously applied for a job at Craft Brew Alliance?
  • When considering to apply for a role with us, did you go buy some beer or visit one of our Brewpubs as research? (Packaged Beer from a Store, Draft Beer from a Bar or other On Premise Account, Visited a Brewpub, None of the Above)

CBA does several things right. Both graphically and from a content standpoint, CBA does a superior job of branding. The survey reflects the look and feel of their brand and the tongue in cheek answer options send a strong message that we are a company that has a personality and we want interesting people working for us.

While CBA has the longest survey (7 questions), they make it entertaining which likely allows for more of the candidates’ attention.

CBA’s feedback will clearly give them great feedback to optimize search and apply functions of their corporate career site. With an open ended question they certainly get anecdotal feedback about what’s working well with their and what isn’t.

And they have included a great anchor question about their employer brand (BEFORE applying my perception of Craft Brew Alliance as an Employer was:). The beauty is that they can ask that question again later in the process. This will allow them to understand if their recruiting process positively or negatively affects brand perception. Brilliant.

In the end, what these corporate career site examples show is that you can’t go wrong embedding feedback collection and analysis. Even if you are not a sophisticated as these three organizations, at the end of the day, just asking is ¾ of the battle. Candidates will be delighted that you even thought to ask their opinion and that will cement strong brand affinity that will help you hire better. That’s the most important benefit of all.